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How to Build Your Own Robot (Grades 1 - 3)

Call us at 817-272-2581 to see if you qualify for a discount on this course.

Dates:June 23-27, 2014
Meets:M, Tu, W, Th and F from 9:00 AM to 12 N, 5 sessions
Hours:15.00
Fee: $199.00  
Textbook:No Book Required
Notes:Thank you very much for your interest in the Kids and Teens University Summer Camps. We are available to make the registration process go as smooth as possible for you. Due to some browsers some of the forms may not download properly. If you are experiencing problems accessing or downloading the required forms please contact our office at 817.272.2581. When you complete the camp registration online please register in the name of the camp/class participant (your child's name), not in your name. This will ensure proper registration.

Sorry, this course is inactive. Please contact our office to see if it will be reinstated, or if alternative classes are available.


Course Description

This age appropriate robot building camp will allow campers to use their imagination and build a robot of their very own. Campers will be taught about robotics with the use of an educational robot kit. They will expand their imagination as they design and program different types of robots in this STEM focused camp. Campers will be amazed to see what their designed robot will be able to do. Camp fee includes supplies. On the final day of camp, parents are invited to come 30 minutes early to enjoy a presentation.

Educational Benefits:
  • Learning about Robotics
  • Spatial Problem Solving
  • Programming Skills
  • Building a working model
  • Interacting creatively with technology
  • Creative Problem Solving and
  • Teamwork
  • Click here to view all Kids and Teens programs and required forms.

    All of our STEM Based-Camps focus on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

    Teks for Science Grade 1

    (2) Recurring themes are pervasive in sciences, mathematics, and technology. These ideas transcend disciplinary boundaries and include patterns, cycles, systems, models, and change and constancy.
    (6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that force, motion, and energy are related and are a part of everyday life. The student is expected to:
    (D) demonstrate and record the ways that objects can move such as in a straight line, zig zag, up and down, back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow.

    Teks for Science Grade 2

    (4) In Grade 2, careful observation and investigation are used to learn about the natural world and reveal patterns, changes, and cycles. Students should understand that certain types of questions can be answered by using observation and investigations and that the information gathered in these may change as new observations are made. As students participate in investigation, they develop the skills necessary to do science as well as develop new science concepts.
    (2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student develops abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry in classroom and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:
    (B) plan and conduct descriptive investigations such as how organisms grow;
    (D) record and organize data using pictures, numbers, and words;
    (3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows that information and critical thinking, scientific problem solving, and the contributions of scientists are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:
    (A) identify and explain a problem in his/her own words and propose a task and solution for the problem such as lack of water in a habitat;
    (4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to investigate the natural world. The student is expected to:
    (A) collect, record, and compare information using tools, including computers, hand lenses, rulers, primary balances, plastic beakers, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, and safety goggles; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; weather instruments such as thermometers, wind vanes, and rain gauges; and materials to support observations of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and
    (B) measure and compare organisms and objects using non-standard units that approximate metric units.
    (5) Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has physical properties and those properties determine how it is described, classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to: (C) demonstrate that things can be done to materials to change their physical properties such as cutting, folding, sanding, and melting; and
    (D) combine materials that when put together can do things that they cannot do by themselves such as building a tower or a bridge and justify the selection of those materials based on their physical properties.

    Teks for Science Grade 3

    (2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:
    (F) communicate valid conclusions supported by data in writing, by drawing pictures, and through verbal discussion.
    (4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and methods to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to:
    (A) collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, wind vanes, rain gauges, pan balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, spring scales, hot plates, meter sticks, compasses, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, sound recorders, and Sun, Earth, and Moon system models; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and
    (5) Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to: (A) measure, test, and record physical properties of matter, including temperature, mass, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;

    Teks for Technology Applications K-Grade 2

    (1) Creativity and innovation. The student uses creative thinking and innovative processes to construct knowledge and develop digital products. The student is expected to:
    (B) create original products using a variety of resources;
    (C) explore virtual environments, simulations, models, and programming languages to enhance learning;
    (D) create and execute steps to accomplish a task; and
    (E) evaluate and modify steps to accomplish a task.

    Teks for Mathematics Grade 1

    (1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:
    (A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
    (C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
    (5) Algebraic reasoning. The student applies mathematical process standards to identify and apply number patterns within properties of numbers and operations in order to describe relationships. The student is expected to:
    (E) understand that the equal sign represents a relationship where expressions on each side of the equal sign represent the same value(s);
    (F) determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation when the unknown may be any one of the three or four terms in the equation; and
    (G) apply properties of operations to add and subtract two or three numbers.
    (6) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to analyze attributes of two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids to develop generalizations about their properties. The student is expected to:
    (A) classify and sort regular and irregular two-dimensional shapes based on attributes using informal geometric language;
    (C) create two-dimensional figures, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares, as special rectangles, rhombuses, and hexagons;
    (D) identify two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares, as special rectangles, rhombuses, and hexagons and describe their attributes using formal geometric language;
    (E) identify three-dimensional solids, including spheres, cones, cylinders, rectangular prisms (including cubes), and triangular prisms, and describe their attributes using formal geometric language;
    (F) compose two-dimensional shapes by joining two, three, or four figures to produce a target shape in more than one way if possible;
    (7) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to select and use units to describe length and time. The student is expected to:
    (A) use measuring tools to measure the length of objects to reinforce the continuous nature of linear measurement;
    (B) illustrate that the length of an object is the number of same-size units of length that, when laid end-to-end with no gaps or overlaps, reach from one end of the object to the other;
    (C) measure the same object/distance with units of two different lengths and describe how and why the measurements differ;

    Teks for Mathematics Grade 2

    (4) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies and methods for whole number computations in order to solve addition and subtraction problems with efficiency and accuracy. The student is expected to:
    (A) recall basic facts to add and subtract within 20 with automaticity;
    (B) add up to four two-digit numbers and subtract two-digit numbers using mental strategies and algorithms based on knowledge of place value and properties of operations;
    (C) solve one-step and multi-step word problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using a variety of strategies based on place value, including algorithms; and
    (D) generate and solve problem situations for a given mathematical number sentence involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000.
    (8) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to analyze attributes of two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids to develop generalizations about their properties. The student is expected to:
    (A) create two-dimensional shapes based on given attributes, including number of sides and vertices;
    (D) compose two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids with given properties or attributes; and
    (E) decompose two-dimensional shapes such as cutting out a square from a rectangle, dividing a shape in half, or partitioning a rectangle into identical triangles and identify the resulting geometric parts.
    (9) Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to select and use units to describe length, area, and time. The student is expected to:
    (A) find the length of objects using concrete models for standard units of length;
    (B) describe the inverse relationship between the size of the unit and the number of units needed to equal the length of an object;
    (C) represent whole numbers as distances from any given location on a number line;
    (D) determine the length of an object to the nearest marked unit using rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes;
    (E) determine a solution to a problem involving length, including estimating lengths;

    Teks for Mathematics Grade 3

    (1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:
    (A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
    (B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;
    (C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
    (G) display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
    (4) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies and methods for whole number computations in order to solve problems with efficiency and accuracy. The student is expected to:
    (A) solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction;
    (G) use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties;
    (H) determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a set of objects is shared equally;
    (K) solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts.

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