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LEGO® Mindstorms EV3: Robotics Engineering (Grades 7 - 8) Afternoon Camp

Call us at 817-272-2581 to see if you qualify for a discount on this course.

Dates:July 21-25, 2014
Meets:M, Tu, W, Th and F from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM, 5 sessions
Hours:15.00
Location:UT Arlington CEWF-E200
Fee: $209.00  
Textbook:No Book Required
Notes:Thank you very much for your interest in the Kids and Teens University Summer Camps. We are available to make the registration process go as smooth as possible for you. Due to some browsers some of the forms may not download properly. If you are experiencing problems accessing or downloading the required forms please contact our office at 817.272.2581. When you complete the camp registration online please register in the name of the camp/class participant (your child's name), not in your name. This will ensure proper registration.

Sorry, this course is inactive. Please contact our office to see if it will be reinstated, or if alternative classes are available.


Course Description

This unique camp creatively challenges campers and gives them the opportunity to explore their engineering abilities. Campers will enthusiastically work in teams to design, build and program a robot using the LEGO® Mindstorms EV3 robotics set and software. Campers can create robots that walk, talk, dance - the only limitation to their creation is their imagination. The possibilities are endless. LEGO® Mindstorms EV3 is the next generation of robotics focusing on teaching Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Each engineering team will build and program a robot using a variety of sensors, motors and intelligent units. This incredible robotics technology embraces and showcases your child's inner creativity and imagination.

Educational Benefits:
  • Learning robotics
  • Making realistic models
  • Spatial skills development
  • Creative problem solving, and
  • Teamwork
  • Click here to view all Kids and Teens programs and required forms.

    All of our STEM Based-Camps focus on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

    TEKS for Robotics and Automation:

    (c) Knowledge and skills
    (5) The student develops the ability to use and maintain technological products, processes, and systems. The student is expected to:
    (A) demonstrate the use of computers to manipulate a robotic or automated system and associated subsystems;
    (B) troubleshoot and maintain systems and subsystems to ensure safe and proper function and precision operation;
    (C) demonstrate knowledge of process control factors; and
    (D) demonstrate knowledge of motors, gears, and gear trains used in the robotic or automated systems.
    (6) The student develops an understanding of the advanced concepts of physics, robotics, and automation. The student is expected to:
    (A) demonstrate knowledge of rotational dynamics, weight, friction, and traction factors required for the operation of robotic and automated systems;
    (B) demonstrate knowledge of torque and power factors used in the operation of robotic systems;
    (C) demonstrate knowledge of feedback control loops to provide information; and
    (D) demonstrate knowledge of different types of sensors used in robotic or automated systems and their operations.
    (7) The student develops an understanding of the characteristics and scope of manipulators and end effectors required for a robotic or automated system to function. The student is expected to:
    (A) demonstrate knowledge of robotic or automated system arm construction;
    (B) understand and discuss the relationship of torque, gear ratio, and weight of payload in a robotic or automated system operation; and
    (C) demonstrate knowledge of end effectors and their use in linkages and the gearing of a robotic or automated system.
    (9) The student learns the function and application of the tools, equipment, and materials used in robotic and automated systems through specific project-based assessments. The student is expected to:
    (A) safely use tools and laboratory equipment to construct and repair systems;
    (B) use precision measuring instruments to analyze systems and prototypes; and
    (C) use multiple software applications to simulate robot behavior and present concepts.
    (10) The student designs products using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:
    (A) interpret industry standard system schematics;
    (B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product;
    (C) improve a product design to meet a specified need;
    (D) understand use of sensors in a robotic or automated system;
    (E) produce system schematics to industry standards;
    (F) evaluate design solutions using conceptual, physical, and mathematical models at various times during the design process to check for proper functionality and to note areas where improvements are needed;
    (G) implement a system to identify and track all components of the robotic or automated system and all elements involved with the operation, construction, and manipulative functions; and
    (H) describe potential patents and the patenting process.
    (11) The student builds a prototype using the appropriate tools, materials, and techniques. The student is expected to:
    (A) identify and describe the steps needed to produce a prototype;
    (B) identify and use appropriate tools, equipment, machines, and materials to produce the prototype;
    (C) implement sensors in a robotic or automated system;
    (D) construct a robotic or automated system to perform specified operations using the design process; (E) test and evaluate the design in relation to pre-established requirements such as criteria and constraints and refine as needed;
    (F) refine the design of a robotic or automated system to ensure quality, efficiency, and manufacturability of the final product; and
    (G) present the prototype using a variety of media.

    TEKS for Robotics Programming and Design:

    (c) Knowledge and skills.
    (1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:
    (A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
    (B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;
    (C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
    (D) communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate;
    (E) create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas;
    (F) analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas; and
    (G) display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
    (2) Creativity and innovation. The student develops products and generates new understanding by extending existing knowledge. The student is expected to:
    (A) produce a prototype;
    (B) present a prototype using a variety of media;
    (C) use the design process to construct a robot;
    (D) refine the design of a robot;
    (E) build robots of simple, moderate, and advanced complexity;
    (F) improve a robot design to meet a specified need;
    (G) demonstrate an understanding of and create artificial intelligence in a robot; and
    (H) create behavior-based control algorithms.
    (3) Communication and collaboration. The student communicates and collaborates with peers to contribute to his or her own learning and the learning of others. The student is expected to:
    (A) demonstrate an understanding of and implement design teams;
    (B) use design teams to solve problems;
    (C) serve as a team leader and a team member;
    (D) describe a problem and identify design specifications;
    (E) design a solution to a problem and share a solution through various media;
    (F) document prototypes, adjustments, and corrections in the design process;
    (G) document a final design and solution; and
    (H) present a final design, testing results, and solution.
    (4) Research and information fluency. The student locates, analyzes, processes, and organizes data. The student is expected to:
    (A) test and evaluate a robot design;
    (B) implement position tracking to complete assigned robot tasks;
    (C) develop solution systems and implement systems analysis;
    (D) modify a robot to respond to a change in specifications; and
    (E) implement a system to identify and track all components of a robot.
    (5) Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making. The student uses appropriate strategies to analyze problems and design algorithms. The student is expected to:
    (A) develop algorithms to control a robot, including applying instructions, collecting sensor data, and performing simple tasks;
    (B) create maneuvering algorithms to physically move the location of a robot;
    (C) create algorithms that provide interaction with a robot;
    (D) demonstrate an understanding of and use output commands, variables, and sequence programming structure;
    (E) demonstrate an understanding of and use jumps, loops, and selection programming structures;
    (F) demonstrate an understanding of and use subroutines, accessors, and modifiers; and
    (G) apply decision-making strategies when developing solutions.
    (7) Technology operations and concepts. The student understands technology concepts, systems, and operations as they apply to computer science. The student is expected to:
    (A) use tools and laboratory equipment safely to construct and repair robots;
    (B) identify and describe the steps needed to produce a prototype;
    (C) use software applications to simulate robotic behavior, present design concepts, and test solution strategies;
    (D) demonstrate the use of computers to manipulate a robot;
    (E) demonstrate knowledge of process control design factors;
    (F) demonstrate knowledge of different types of sensors used in robotics;
    (G) demonstrate knowledge and use of effectors;
    (H) implement multiple sensors in a robot;
    (I) interpret sensor feedback and calculate threshold values;
    (J) demonstrate knowledge of motors, gears, and gear trains used in a robot;
    (K) implement infrared range sensing;
    (L) apply measurement and geometry to calculate robot navigation;
    (M) implement movement control using shaft encoding;
    (N) demonstrate robot navigation;
    (O) implement path planning using geometry and multiple sensor feedback;
    (P) program a robot to perform simple tasks, including following lines, moving objects, and avoiding obstacles;
    (Q) demonstrate and implement a robotic task solution using robotic arm construction;
    (R) demonstrate knowledge of feedback control loops to provide information;
    (S) demonstrate knowledge of torque and power factors used in the operation of a robot servo; and
    (T) troubleshoot and maintain robotic systems and subsystems.

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